• Yorkshire: 01423 520 052 | North East: 0191 232 8391 | Livingston: 01506 303 031 | London: 020 3011 5252

Early retirement page

Staggered Retirement

560 315 Eleonore Bylo

A more popular and increasingly common option many are considering.

Giving up the 9-to-5 doesn’t necessarily mean stopping work. But retirement planning has taken on an entirely new dimension as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak with many big questions being asked. When you picture yourself in your golden years, are you sitting on a beach, hitting the golf course, or still working behind a desk? For many people of retirement age, continuing to work is an option they are considering. Increasingly people are planning to stagger work or work flexibly. This can really appeal to some individuals who have caring responsibilities or health issues, or who are thinking about retiring in the next few years. 

Sudden transition from working five days a week

Several decades ago, working and retirement were binary terms, with little overlap. People were either working (and under the age of 65) or had hit the age of 65 and were retired. That’s no longer true, however, as staggered retirement is becoming more popular and more common.

Few people benefit from the sudden transition from working five days a week to not working at all. Retirement can often be an unsettling period and it’s not surprising given that the most common path into retirement is to go ‘cold turkey’ and simply stop working. 

More flexible retirement and working part-time

New research has highlighted the fact that fewer people are deciding against completely stopping working and are opting for a staggered and more flexible retirement and working part-time[1]. Nearly one in three (32%) pensioners in their 60s and 16% of over70s have left their pensions untouched. And of those who haven’t accessed their pension pot, nearly half (48%) of those in their 60s, and 24% of over-70s, say it is because they are still working. With people living longer, and the added prospect of health care costs in laterlife, retirees increasingly  understand the benefits of having a larger pension pot in later life.

Pensions are required to last as long as possible

Of those who haven’t accessed their pension pot, half (51%) say it is because they are still working while more than a quarter (25%) of people in their 60s say it is because they want their pensions to last as long as possible. Of course, retirees who haven’t accessed their pension pot must have alternative sources of income. When asked about their income, nearly half said they take an income from cash savings (47%), others rely on their spouse or partner’s income (35%) or State Pension (22%) while 12% rely on income from property investments added prospect of health care costs in laterlife, retirees increasingly understand the benefits of having a larger pension pot in later life. 

Offering people different financial and health benefits

This trend for staggered retirements offers many financial and health benefits. It is often taken for granted but continued good health is one of the best financial assets people can have. The benefits of working – such as remaining physically active and continued social interaction – can make a big difference to people’s mental wellbeing and overall health in retirement. People are increasingly making alternative choices about retirement to ensure that they do not run out of money, but it’s also really important to make pension savings work past retirement age so as not to miss out on the ability to generate growth above inflation for when there is the requirement to start drawing a pension. 

Worried about retirement uncertainty?

Planning your financial future is one of the most important things you can do in your life. Do you require professional advice and help with your retirement planning during this difficult time? Speak to us to find out how we can help you.

Retiring happy

Retire Happy

560 315 Eleonore Bylo

Retiring happyPlanning your future has arguably never been more important.

10 tips to enjoy the retirement you want

  1. Review your spending habits and consider if you have the scope to save a little more each month.
  2. Look up your annual benefit statements – you may have saved with more than one employer’s pension scheme.
  3. Think about what financial milestones you’d need to reach in order to increase your pension contributions and review your investment choices.
  4. Find out more about your current pension plan. If you pay in more, does your employer match your contributions?
  5. Track down old pension schemes using the government’s finder service https://www.gov.uk/find-pension-contact-details. Or request contact details from the government’s Pension Tracing Service on 0800 731 0193 or by post.
  6. Check that your Expression of Wish form is up to date. This is a request setting out whom you would like to receive any death benefits payable on your death.
  7. Check your State Pension entitlement. To receive the full State Pension when you reach State Pension age you must have paid or been credited with 35 qualifying years of National Insurance contributions. Visit the Government Pension Service https://www.gov.uk/contact-pension-service for information about your State Pension.
  8. Add up the savings and investments that you could use for your retirement. A pension is a very tax-efficient way to save for your retirement but you might also have other savings or investments that you could use to increase your income when you retire.
  9. If you’re getting close to retirement and the amount you’re likely to retire on is less than you’d hoped, consider ways to boost your pension.
  10. Decide when to start taking your pension. You need to set a target date when you want to start drawing an income from your pension – and remember, you don’t have to stop working to take your pension but you must be aged at least 55 (you might be able to do this earlier if you’re in very poor health).

Please contact us if you require any further information or guidance on your retirement.

Would you love to retire early?

560 315 Eleonore Bylo

Craving a better work/life balance? Wanting to spend more time with family and friends? Yearning to get on with that bucket list that you haven’t quite finished or even started?

You are not alone. The pandemic has many of us look at life in a different manner, having been forced off that daily treadmill and now we just don’t want to get back on.

You may now be one of the many actively seeking early retirement options.

The key is to be in a financial position to enjoy this time of your life, while, making sure you don’t outlive your retirement savings. Whilst creating a retirement plan so you don’t run out of money sounds like an obvious choice, it may not be as straightforward as it sounds. For all you cannot know exactly how much money you will spend when you retire, you can know what your lifestyle costs are now to know if you are financially ready to retire.

Equally, with living costs rising and interest rates fluctuating, you may also need to factor in or consider generating additional income, to boost your state and private pensions.

Grandparents with family on beach after thinking they would love to retire earlyWould you love to retire early

The key imperative is to create a plan and to ask a qualified Financial Adviser to develop a living cash flow model for you, so you can see exactly the impact of income vs expenditure, where the income gaps are and put an action plan in place together.

Here at Ellis Bates, we will discuss the best ways to bring your early retirement plans to life. We want you to be able to enjoy the things in life that mean the most to you and your family.

So, we are ready when you are, to listen to you and help you plan.