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The Bottom Line: Why Shrewd Customers Use An Adviser | Independent Financial Adviser

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By Grant Ellis, Director Ellis Bates Group

Let’s face it – Financial Advisers have a bit of an image problem. In the public’s mind they probably rank alongside bankers, second-hand car dealers and estate agents in the trustworthiness stakes, and every investment fraud and mis-selling scandal that’s gleefully reported by the press does nothing to improve this. Then there’s the thorny issue of fees, and the anecdotal view that Adviser fees are unjustifiably high, and that they’re all simply out to line their own pockets at the customer’s expense.

So, is this image and reputation deserved? Should Financial Advisers be viewed with suspicion or is this all a myth? Let’s take a look at a few facts.

In 2017 the ILC-UK published its report The Value of Financial Advice, which quantified, for the first time, the real value of taking financial advice. The results strongly demonstrate the positive value of financial advice for consumers – both amongst those who are wealthy and those less well-off too.

The report concluded that those who were wealthy and took financial advice accumulated 17% more in liquid financial assets and 16% more in pension wealth than those who hadn’t consulted an Adviser. For those ‘just getting by’ the figures were even more dramatic – 39% more liquid assets and 21% more pension wealth for those who took advice; all more than enough to justify the fees charged by the Adviser.

Alongside demonstrating real value for their customers, evidence from this report also reveals that the experience of taking advice is highly satisfactory – 9 in 10 people were satisfied with the advice received with the vast majority deciding to go with their Adviser’s recommendation.

In December last year ILC-UK issued an updated analysis which not only reinforced their 2017 findings but in addition demonstrated that fostering an ongoing relationship with a Financial Adviser leads to even better financial outcomes. For example, those who reported receiving advice at both time points in ILC’s analysis had nearly 50% higher average pension wealth than those only advised at the start.

So, given this independent assessment, it begs the question why Advisers have such a poor image, and since advice has clear benefits for customers, why more people don’t seek it? The ILC-UK report sheds some light on this too.

The two most powerful driving forces of whether people sought advice were whether the individual trusts the Adviser providing the advice and that individual’s level of financial capability. Clearly therefore the more Advisers can demonstrate trustworthiness, the more likely they are to attract customers.

There are a number of ways you can assess an Adviser’s credentials – checking they are actually on the FCA register and how long they have been in business is a good starting point. The most effective check however is to ask their customers. Get the prospective Adviser to give you testimonials from satisfied customers along with the number and scoring of verified reviews they’ve had from clients.  At Ellis Bates Financial Advisers we encourage all our customers to leave a review of the service they have received with an independent review company. Check out the following link for more information https://www.ellisbates.com/about/reviews/

The International Longevity Centre UK (ILC) is the UK’s specialist think tank on the impact of longevity on society. The ILC was established in 1997, as one of the founder members of the International Longevity Centre Global Alliance, an international network on longevity.

Ellis Bates Financial Advisers are independent financial advisers with offices across the United Kingdom.  They specialise in active investment management of over £1 billion of assets on behalf of clients, who have given them a 4.9/5.00 score with Trustist. https://www.ellisbates.com/about/reviews/

For more information please visit their website www.ellisbates.com

The Big ‘Lies’ About Our Economic Prospects

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By Grant Ellis, Director Ellis Bates Group

In the spring of 2007 I hosted a conference for a group of insurance professionals. One of the most popular speakers was my old friend the economist Roger Martin-Fagg. He was his usual entertaining self, but took everyone by surprise by suggesting that the world economy was on the brink of a meltdown the like of which we had never seen before, and it was going to happen soon – probably within 12 months. Yes, he predicted the financial crash of 2008 a year before it actually happened.

Now in Spring 2007 the world economy was doing very nicely thank you. Following three consecutive years of good growth, averaging 3.8% it was expected to fall only slightly in 2007 to 3.6%. Meanwhile the UK was doing pretty well too. House prices had risen from an average of £150,633 in January 2005 to £184,330 in May 2007 – a rise of 22.4%, whilst wages grew by an average of over 5% per annum between 2004 and 2007. Inflation on the other hand was under control and only rose by an average of 3.25% in the same period. Furthermore, between 2003 and 2007 the FTSE All Share Index grew by 49%, so overall everyone was feeling pretty optimistic about the prospects for the future. No one, other than Roger was saying anything about a recession, never mind a full blown crash!

So, when Roger issued his dire warning, the overwhelming response was to laugh it off – in the same way that we would laugh at a soothsayer predicting the end of the world. Eccentric yes, and likely to happen eventually, just not anytime soon.

You can imagine that those of us who were there in 2007 are far less likely to write off Roger’s opinions now than we would have done previously.

I was therefore pleasantly surprised, and heartened to receive his latest Economic update, penned on 16 June. Once again he is at odds with the mainstream view, and indeed is critical of others talking world economic prospects down. He opens his piece by saying that the press is being irresponsible in the way it is reporting our economic outlook. His opening paragraph reads:

“Last weekend the Daily Telegraph had a banner headline: ‘Britain’s biggest ever collapse in GDP wipes out 18 years of growth’. This statement is completely wrong. I am concerned that individuals who are trying to make the right judgement call are being fed this nonsense. To be clear: 18 years ago our GDP was £1 trillion. It is now £2.2 trillion. The reduction in spending in April was 20% on the previous April. The monthly flow of spending averages £200bn. 20% of that is £40bn. The media, as we know, impact emotion and decision taking. That Telegraph article is therefore both economically illiterate and irresponsible.”

Wow! Hard hitting stuff. And the perpetuation of such comments is still evident a week later. In the Sunday Times on 21 June Sajid Javid is quoted as saying:

“We’ve seen a 25% fall in GDP in two months. To put that in some perspective, that is 18 years of growth wiped out in two months.”

And that’s from our erstwhile Chancellor of the Exchequer, who should be anything but economically illiterate!

In his update Roger goes on to suggest that, despite what the world and his wife are saying, we are not going to have a recession. Indeed, whilst he acknowledges that quarter 2 of 2020 will be significantly negative, he expects quarter 3 to be significantly positive, and predicts that the UK economy could grow by 8.5% in 2021, with the World economy back to 2.5% growth next year too.

His argument is that the fundamentals for a recession don’t exist in the same way as they did for previous recessions; rising prices and interest rates squeezing individuals and companies alike in 1979 and 1989, and banks stopping lending in 2008.  The common factor is a shortage of money available, and that’s not the case this time around. Households have seen a reduction in income, but a larger fall in what they’ve spent, and the UK Government is spending an extra £40bn a month pumping new money into the system, so no shortage here. Roger predicts a mini boom to take off in the next few months as a result of this excess cash in the system, with the only thing that could dampen it being the media reporting company closures, an increase in the R well above 1, and stories of mass redundancies.

I don’t propose to reproduce all Roger’s arguments here – you can read the whole article at https://www.ellisbates.com/news/june-2020-economic-update/ to get the complete picture, but I would say his reasoning and logic are very persuasive. And I for one would not bet against him. I also fully endorse his condemnation of sensationalist reporting in the media. They have to take more responsibility for the message they send out as, rightly or wrongly, people do listen to them. A more evenhanded and less melodramatic approach to reporting would benefit us all. After all, we all know the power of ‘fake news’ by now, don’t we?

Ellis Bates Financial Advisers are Independent Financial Advisers with offices across the United Kingdom. They manage over £1 billion of assets on behalf of clients, who have given them a 4.9/5.00 score with Trustist. https://www.ellisbates.com/about/reviews/

For more information please visit their website www.ellisbates.com

Sources:
World Economic Situation and Prospects 2007 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.07.II.C.2), released in January 2007 accessed on 21 June 2020

Office of National Statistics UK House Price Index, accessed on 21 June 2020
Office of National Statistics Wages and Salaries average growth rate percentage, accessed on 21 June 2020
Office of National Statistics RPI All Items: Percentage change over 12 months, accessed on 21 June 2020
Swanlowpark.co.uk FTSE 100 and FTSE All-Share since 1985, accessed, on 21 June 2020

7 Great Reasons Why You should Plan For Death!

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By Grant Ellis, Director Ellis Bates Group

In 1789 Benjamin Franklin said there are only two certainties in life – death and taxes. We all seem happy to talk about taxes, but less keen on discussing, or planning for our ultimate demise. It’s as if by talking about it we are somehow tempting fate. But it can bring tremendous peace of mind not only to the planner, but also to their loved ones to know that a well thought out programme is in place for their eventual departure. Here are 7 good reasons why you shouldn’t put off planning for it – old or young.

Dying without leaving a Will is not a good idea

If you haven’t made a Will, then when you die, everything you own will be shared out according to the law instead of in accordance with your wishes. This could mean your estate passes to someone you hadn’t intended – or that someone you want to pass things on to ends up with nothing. For example, if you’re not married and not in a civil partnership, your partner is not legally entitled to anything when you die. If you’re married, your husband or wife might inherit most or all of your estate and your children might not get anything (except in Scotland). This is true even if you’re separated. If you have children or grandchildren, how much they are legally entitled to, will depend on where you live in the UK. All of this can be avoided if you make a Will, setting out your wishes.

Oh, and if you needed any more persuading, if you do die without having left a Will, all your assets are likely to be frozen until the estate is sorted out, which can mean hardship for your loved ones in the meantime. And it’s much more expensive to use the courts to reconcile an estate, so there’ll be less left over for your family too. It really is a ‘no brainer.’

For more information visit https://www.ellisbates.com/individuals/inheritance/

Make provision for if you are no longer capable

A good number of us can expect to lose our mental capacity as we get older and this can be just as difficult for the family to deal with as death, if not more so. It’s therefore prudent to not only leave a Will but also Lasting Powers of Attorney for our finances and our health and welfare. These will give our family or trusted loved ones the capacity to make decisions on our behalf when we’re no longer able to, ensuring that bills get paid, and that any decisions about our health can be made by those who are closest to us.

Document your health preferences up front

You should also consider leaving a ‘Living Will’ which is a statement of your wishes intended to guide your family (when you are not able to make the decision yourself) about what treatment you might want in various scenarios. This will give them the confidence that they are acting in accordance with your actual wishes rather than trying to second guess you.

Don’t leave your young family in the lurch

All of this is especially important if you have dependants, but it’s not the only thing that needs to be addressed. Too many of us assume that if anything happens to us, the state will step in and look after our family. That may be the case up to a point, but it won’t be easy on those you leave behind. Much better to take out some low cost life assurance when you’re young, to pay out if anything happens to you. This will give your family a cushion to tide them over should your income be lost to them, or alternatively you have to pay for childcare if your partner is no longer around. It’s only really necessary whilst you have financial responsibilities to others, so can lapse once the mortgage is paid off and the kids have finished education. It is surprisingly inexpensive too.

For more information visit https://www.ellisbates.com/individuals/financial-protection/

Talk to each other about what you want to achieve with what you leave behind

We’ve all seen the TV dramas, where the family solicitor reads out the deceased’s Will, and everyone is shocked by what it contains. Unless you’ve a vindictive streak, that is not really how it should be. It’s much better to talk to your loved ones openly and candidly about your assets, and what you’d like to do with them when you pass on. Often there are 3 generations to consider, and an open and frank discussion, perhaps aided and abetted by your financial adviser will help to make sure everyone understands what your plans are. It may be for example that you initially expect to leave your assets to your children, but they may prefer it if you left them to their children instead. Discussing such things up front helps set everyone’s expectations, and avoids any conflict and disappointment later on.

Plan early to leave more to your family and less to the taxman

Inheritance tax is a tax on the estate, and is potentially payable at a rate of 40% once the estate has a value of over £325,000. So if you are leaving behind a substantial estate, you could be leaving your loved ones with a large tax bill too. However, with some simple planning you can significantly reduce the amount of tax payable. It’s a complicated area so you should seek some specialist advice from a financial adviser, preferably one who is affiliated to the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners.

Make a plan for your funeral

The last thing your family will want to do in the days following your demise is argue about what they think you may have wanted for your funeral, so leave them some instructions. Things like burial or cremation, whether you want a religious service or not, what songs or music you’d like to have played, and whether or not you want it to be a celebration of your life or a more sombre affair. All these decisions can be taken up front and take away any pressure on the family at what will be a difficult time.

Hopefully I’ve persuaded you that there are at least seven really good reasons why you should plan for your death now rather than put it off into the future. So, what are you waiting for?

Ellis Bates Financial Advisers are independent financial advisers with offices across the United Kingdom. They specialise in Estate Planning and manage over £1 billion of assets on behalf of clients, who have given them a 4.9/5.00 score with Trustist https://www.ellisbates.com/about/reviews/

For more information please visit their website www.ellisbates.com

Employee Wellbeing

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Active steps to make sure your people are happy, healthy and financially sound. Employee health and wellbeing is high on many businesses’ agendas and is no longer merely an afterthought when addressing sickness absence. There is an obvious link between a happy, healthy workforce and improved productivity.

The aim should be to reduce direct healthcare costs, build and sustain high employee morale, drive effective recruitment and retention, improve productivity, and reduce the damaging trend of presenteeism.

Physical Wellbeing of Staff

But research from GRiD[1], the industry body for the group risk industry, shows that 34% of employers don’t offer any support for the physical wellbeing of staff. Changes to lifestyle can reduce the risk of cancer[2], so support for physical wellbeing can be an important way for employers to help their staff in terms of prevention.

Furthermore, only one in five (20%) employers offer initiatives to encourage staff to be more active to improve their health, and only 14% offer training on specific areas such as smoking cessation, nutrition, fitness and lifestyle.

Integral to Full Holistic Support

Supporting the physical wellbeing of staff is integral to full, holistic support of staff, and there are many ways that employers can do this, from encouraging lunchtime walks and standing meetings to providing access to specialists to advise on nutrition and health.

The options available for employers to support the physical wellbeing of staff are constantly being developed. Support for physical health isn’t just about treatment but about prevention and early intervention too, and it’s important that all are considered when employers are looking at how to support staff best.

Early Involvement in Absence

Some illnesses will result in long-term absence. The cost of sickness absence is often high up the list of organisational concerns for an employer, so early involvement in absence and maximising rehabilitation support is prudent.

Cancer is a leading cause of claim[3] across all group risk products (employer-sponsored life assurance, income protection and critical illness), so we know just how much cancer affects employees and their companies.

Investment in employee wellbeing should be high on any company’s priorities.

The financial support offered is important at a time when people need it most, but it’s important that all the other support – both in terms of prevention and early intervention – are not overlooked: they play an incredibly important part in employers looking after the health and wellbeing of their staff. If you’re a business owner and would like to discuss this further, please contact us to assess your options.

Source data:
[1] Research undertaken by Opinium on behalf of GRiD amongst 500 HR Decision makers between 4 and 18 March 2019.
[2] www.macmillan.org.uk/information-andsupport/diagnosing/causes-and-risk-factors/potential-causes-of-cancer/age-lifestyle-dietreducing-risk.html
[3] GRiD 2019 Claims Survey

Coronavirus (COVID-19) – helping us all to stay safe

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At Ellis Bates our number one priority is the health and wellbeing of our clients, colleagues and their families.  Recommended guidance is being issued daily and we constantly review this in order to help us decide on the best approach.  We will always follow government guidance and do what is right for all concerned.

We have made the decision, with immediate effect, to ask our teams of Advisers to conduct all meetings with our clients over the phone or by video.  If you feel it is essential that we meet with you face to face, please contact your Adviser in the first instance and we will try to understand your situation and what we can best do to support you.

We are still here to help and our Advisers continue to be available to deliver our financial planning service, and provide advice and support.  We have over 100 colleagues across three main offices and will have a fully operational plan in place to ensure our colleagues can continue to deliver a great service to you.

We will closely monitor the situation to make sure we take all necessary precautions to protect our colleagues and clients alike. Please do contact us if you have any concerns or queries.

Yorkshire Financial Awards 2020

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We are delighted to announce we have been shortlisted at the Yorkshire Financial Awards 2020 in all three categories that we have entered. The final will take place on the 27th February at New Dock Hall, Leeds. We are finalists in the following areas;

  • Best Employer
  • Financial Adviser Team of the Year
  • Wealth Manager of the Year

Barker Brooks Communications, organisers of the event, explain that the awards have been developed to celebrate the incredible financial services industry, and the achievements and successes of the region’s best and brightest. We will keep our fingers crossed for a win or three to start off the year!

Our Trailblazer Award Winner

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Ellis Bates are delighted to announce that our Investment Portfolio Manager, Anthony Graham, has been awarded the “Trailblazer Standard” by a panel of independent judges at Investment Week, an industry investment publication. The Trailblazer Awards were designed to identify the next generation of UK investment professionals that will make a difference to the financial industry.

Since Anthony joined the Ellis Bates Investment team in 2014 he has driven the evolution of our investment analysis and become a key member of the Investment Team in his role as Portfolio Manager. We are very proud of his contribution internally and the standards he sets, and to see this recognised by his peers within the industry is a wonderful endorsement for him and the company as a whole.

There is an enormous amount of work involved to ensure the Ellis Bates portfolios meet our clients’ expectations, and Anthony plays a significant role in all aspects of their construction and ongoing management.

hotel with palm trees and pool

Lasting Power Of Attorney

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hotel with palm trees and poolMaking decisions on your behalf during your lifetime

A Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) is a legal document that allows you to appoint one or more people to make decisions on your behalf during your lifetime. The people you appoint to manage your affairs are called the ‘attorneys’. An LPA is a completely separate legal document to your Will, although many people put them in place at the same time as getting their will written, as part of wanting to plan for the future.

During your lifetime 

Once you have an LPA in place, you can have peace of mind that there is someone you trust to look after your affairs if you became unable to do so yourself during your lifetime. This may occur, for example, because of an illness, old age or an accident. 

Having an LPA in place can allow your attorney to have authority to deal with your finances and property, as well as make decisions about your health and welfare. Your LPA can include binding instructions together with general preferences for your attorney to consider. Your LPA should reflect your particular wishes so you know that the things that matter most would be taken care of.

Required legal capacity 

You can only put an LPA in place whilst you are capable of understanding the nature and effect of the document (for example, you have the required legal capacity). After this point, you cannot enter into an LPA, and no one can do so on your behalf. 

Many people don’t know that their next of kin has no automatic legal right to manage their spouse’s affairs without an LPA in place, so having to make decisions on their behalf can become prolonged and significantly more expensive.

A Lasting Power of Attorney for health and welfare can generally make decisions about matters including: 

  • Where you should live 
  •  Your medical care and what you should eat 
  •  Who you should have contact with 
  •  What kind of social activities you should take part in 

You can also give special permission for your attorney to make decisions about life-saving treatment.

Lasting Power of Attorney for property and financial affairs decisions can cover:   

  • Buying and selling property 
  •  Paying the mortgage 
  •  Paying bills 
  •  Arranging repairs to property

Manage your affairs 

Without an LPA in place, there is no one with the legal authority to manage your affairs, for example, to access bank accounts or investments in your name or sell your property on your behalf. Unfortunately, many people assume that their spouse, partner or children will just be able to take care of things, but the reality is that simply isn’t the case. 

In these circumstances, in order for someone to obtain legal authority over your affairs, that person would need to apply to the Court of Protection, and the Court will decide on the person to be appointed to manage your affairs. The person chosen is appointed your ‘deputy’. This is a very different type of appointment, which is significantly more involved and costly than being appointed attorney under an LPA.

 If you wish to have peace of mind that a particular person will have the legal authority to look after your affairs, and you want to make matters easier for them and less expensive, then you should obtain professional advice about putting in place an LPA.

Health and Welfare Lasting Power of Attorney 

This allows you to name attorneys to make decisions about your healthcare, treatments and living arrangements if you lose the ability to make those decisions yourself. Unlike the Property and Financial Affairs LPA, this document will only ever become effective if you lack the mental capacity to make decisions for yourself. 

If you can’t communicate your wishes, you could end up in a care home when you may have preferred to stay in your own home. You may also receive medical treatments or be put into a nursing home that you would have refused, if only you had the opportunity to express yourself – and this is when your attorney, appointed by the LPA, can speak for you.

Property and Financial Affairs Lasting Power of Attorney 

This allows you to name attorneys to deal with all your property and financial assets in England and Wales. The LPA document can be restricted, so it can only be used if you were to lose mental capacity, or it can be used more widely, such as if you suffer from illness, have mobility issues or if you spend time outside the UK.

If you wish to have peace of mind that a particular person will have the legal authority to look after your affairs, and you want to make matters easier for them and less expensive, then you should obtain professional advice about putting in place an lpa.

investment deal

Why do you want to Invest?

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Reaching Specific Life Goals Requires Planning

If you don’t know where you want to go, you’ll find it tricky getting there! Investment goals cover everything from the old adage of saving for a rainy day to planning for a comfortable retirement.

Goal-based investing emphasises investing with the objective of reaching specific life goals – such as buying a house, saving for your child’s education or building a nest egg for retirement – instead of comparing returns to a benchmark. Whatever your personal investment goals may be, it is important to consider the time horizon at the outset, as this will impact the type of investments you should consider to help achieve your goals. It also makes sense to revisit your goals at regular intervals to account for any changes to your personal circumstances, for example, the arrival of a new member to the family or salary increases. Investment strategies should often include a combination of various fund types in order to obtain a balanced approach to investment risk. And maintaining a balanced approach is usually key to the chances of achieving your investment goals, while bearing in mind that at some point you will want access to your money.

Short Term Lifestyle Planning

 Knowing you’re prepared for life’s surprises can take a burden of your mind – and your bank balance. An emergency fund is a pot of money set aside to help you cover the financial surprises that life throws at you – surprises such as losing your job, needing to make unexpected home repairs, replacing your car or unplanned emergency travel. These events can be stressful and costly, but preparing in advance can be a big help.

Medium Term School And University Fees Planning 

School and university fees planning may involve the same idea of buying a mix of equities, bonds and other investments in order to build enough capital to pay for future fees. Most are geared to begin paying out after a fixed-term horizon, usually ten years, with withdrawals allowed incrementally after that to meet the fees. In this way, they need to be more flexible than pension plans that pay out on retirement. For this reason, many parents and grandparents often start planning when a baby is born, which provides a better way to pay fees in monthly payments, making the cost of an independent education or university education more manageable.

Long Term Retirement Planning

The importance of shifting goals can be seen in pension plans, where it is quite common for funds to be more geared towards equities in their early stages to try to build capital growth. As the individual grows closer to retirement age, the pension plan will tend to lean more towards bonds to reduce volatility. Exposure to other riskier sectors may also be gradually reduced as the individual ages.

Factors To Help You Develop Your Investment Goals Your Goal 

What are you investing for, and how much are you hoping to get back?

Your Attitude To Risk

How comfortable are you with taking risk with your money, as you may get back less than you invested? 

Your Time Horizon

How long are you prepared to put your money away for?

 Income, Growth Or Both 

Do you want to look at funds that aim to make regular payments through dividends or interest (like an income), or at those that aim to increase in value over time?

The Important Thing Is To Do Something 

Setting goals makes it more likely that you’ll save for – and achieve – every goal. You’ll also be more motivated to reach a goal since you can gauge its progress. To discuss your future plans and discover how to achieve them, please speak to us.

yacht on the water

Trusts

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yacht on the waterProtecting, preserving or ultimately distributing wealth

As part of your Inheritance Tax planning, you may want to consider putting assets in trust – either during your lifetime or under the terms of your Will. Putting assets in trust – rather than making a direct gift to a beneficiary – can be a more flexible way of achieving your objectives.

For example:

  • You might want assets that will pass to a child to be held on trust until they are older
  • You might want assets to eventually pass to your children, but to ensure that your spouse can benefit from them for the rest of his or her life

The tax treatment of trusts is complex and depends on such factors as the kind of trust, the value of the assets put into it, and who the beneficiaries are. Recent changes to the rules mean that the tax treatment of some trusts is no longer as favourable as it used to be, but there are still circumstances in which they can help to reduce the overall level of tax payable.

The structures into which you can transfer your assets can have lasting consequences for you and your family, and it is crucial that you choose the right ones. The right structures can protect assets and give your family lasting benefits. A trust can be used to reduce how much Inheritance Tax your estate will have to pay on your death.

Legal arrangement

A trust, in principle, is a very simple concept. It is a legal arrangement where the ownership of someone’s assets (such as property, shares or cash) is transferred to someone else (usually a small group of people or a trust company) to manage and use to benefit a third person (or group of people). An appropriate trust can be used to reduce how much Inheritance Tax your estate will have to pay on your death.

chandelier The main types of trust

Bare (Absolute) Trusts: The beneficiaries are entitled to a specific share of the trust, which can’t be changed once the trust has been established. The settlor (person who puts the assets in trust) decides on the beneficiaries and shares at outset. A simple and straightforward trust – the trustees invest the trust fund for the beneficiaries but don’t have the power to change the beneficiaries’ interests decided on by the settlor at outset. Offers the potential Income Tax and Capital Gains Tax benefits, particularly for minor beneficiaries. The assets, both income and capital, are immediately owned and can be taken by the beneficiary at age 18 (16 in Scotland).

Interest In Possession Trusts

With this type of trust, the beneficiaries have a right to all the income from the trust, but not necessarily the capital. Sometimes a different beneficiary will get the capital – say, on the death of the income beneficiary. They’re often set up under the terms of a Will to allow a spouse to benefit from the income during their lifetime, but with the capital being owned by their children. The capital is distributed on the remaining parent’s death.

Discretionary (Flexible) Trusts

The settlor decides who can potentially benefit from the trust, but the trustees are then able to use their discretion to determine who, when and in what amounts beneficiaries do actually benefit. Provides maximum flexibility compared to the other trust types, and for this reason is often referred to as a ‘Flexible Trust’.

A few trusts will now have to pay an Inheritance Tax charge when they are set up, at ten-yearly intervals and even when assets are distributed. You should always obtain professional advice on whether trusts could be of benefit for your particular circumstances and requirements.

TAX TREATMENT DEPENDS ON INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES AND MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE IN THE FUTURE. THE INFORMATION GIVEN IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE LEGAL, TAX OR FINANCIAL ADVICE.
WITH THIS TYPE OF TRUST, THE BENEFICIARIES HAVE A RIGHT TO ALL THE INCOME FROM THE TRUST, BUT NOT NECESSARILY THE CAPITAL. SOMETIMES A DIFFERENT BENEFICIARY WILL GET THE CAPITAL – SAY, ON THE DEATH OF THE INCOME BENEFICIARY.